The royal effect

© Written by Rachael Taylor for Kensington & Chelsea 

When it comes to announcements, they don’t get bigger than a royal engagement. An outright frenzy erupted when His Royal Highness Prince Harry got down on one knee to Meghan Markle; a promise that will be fulfilled in May. But for some, the impact of that excitement will last a lifetime as brides-to-be, whipped up in dreams of being princesses, choose lookalike engagement rings.

“We probably get more enquiries about that than anything else,” says Garrard senior marketing executive Madeleine David, referring to what is perhaps the world’s most famous engagement ring – the Ceylon blue sapphire and diamond cluster worn by The Duchess of Cambridge. The ring was originally made by Garrard for His Royal Highness Prince Charles to present to Princess Diana when he proposed in 1981, passing down the family line to Kate Middleton when His Royal Highness Prince William popped the question, but David says that the origins of the design go back much further.

“People come in and ask for the Kate ring, but we say that we don’t do the exact thing, it’s just the most modern interpretation. It was chosen by Charles and Diana but it’s a classic Garrard design that started when Prince Albert worked with Garrard to commission the sapphire cluster brooch that he gave to Queen Victoria on the day before her wedding day as her something blue. So it’s not Kate’s ring or Diana’s ring, it’s actually Victoria’s brooch.”…

This story was published in the April 2018 issues of Kensington & Chelsea, Mayfair, Marylebone & Fitzrovia, Notting Hill & Holland Park magazines (click through to see digital versions of each issue, and continue reading to see magazine layouts). 

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