Secrets of a jewellery journalist

© Dazeera

Jewellery journalist, Rachael Taylor, gives us the inside scoop on what it’s like to write about jewellery professionally, how she got into it, and what her secret indulgences would be if she could choose any jewel in the world to own. Hear her thoughts on the topic of jewellery as art at our next exhibition in South Kensington.

HAVE YOU ALWAYS HAD AN INTEREST IN JEWELLERY?

I have always had an interest in jewellery, although I would not say I’ve always had incredibly good taste in jewellery. My early introductions to precious metals were straight out of a Littlewoods catalogue – leaping gold dolphin necklaces, curb-link chains, signet rings. I was a bit of a tomboy and my tastes reflected that. Although, all this is really trendy now, so perhaps I was just a (very) early adopter! My appreciation and understanding of jewellery truly developed when I landed a job at industry magazine Retail Jeweller in 2008, which was more by chance than design. I was already working for the publisher at the time, and someone suggested me for the role. It turned out to be a great fit, and I was soon completely immersed in the jewellery industry and totally enamoured by everything I was learning and seeing, and the colourful characters I met. It was a whole new world, and one that I still enjoy a decade after my first encounter.

WHAT IS THE MOST INTERESTING THING YOU HAVE DISCOVERED ABOUT JEWELLERY SINCE YOU STARTED WRITING ABOUT IT?

Other than the people – and that really has been a huge part of why I’ve stayed reporting on jewellery – I would have to say that I’ve become totally fascinated by gemmology. This came to me slightly later in my career. In the early days, I was very much focused on the people and businesses driving the industry, but when I started to write for Maria Doulton’s website The Jewellery Editor in 2015, when I started freelancing, I was commissioned to write a series of stories that delved deeply into different gemstones – how they are formed, the chemical compositions that create their colour, the history of their discovery, how they are best used. Perhaps because I hadn’t written too much about the specifics of the stones themselves before this, I did a lot of research into each, reading GIA reports, talking to experts on each stone. It really fired something in me, and I felt like after years of writing about jewellery, I suddenly had found a whole new vein of exploration and discovery. A few years later, and I’m still learning about and discovering gemstones I hadn’t heard of before. It keeps it interesting…

Read the full interview I did with Dazera about my career as a jewellery journalist here.

 

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